Celebration Pro Podcast

#76: Leveraging Emails & Launching Your Wedding Services with Jenny Roth

May 13, 2024 Carin Hunt Season 1 Episode 75
#76: Leveraging Emails & Launching Your Wedding Services with Jenny Roth
Celebration Pro Podcast
More Info
Celebration Pro Podcast
#76: Leveraging Emails & Launching Your Wedding Services with Jenny Roth
May 13, 2024 Season 1 Episode 75
Carin Hunt

MEET JENNY:
Jenny Roth is a sales copywriter for female-founded companies.

She believes good copy does more than make sales – it also leaves your clients feeling excited to work with you! Her copy continues to be the backbone of several multi-figure+ launches each quarter.

When she isn’t writing or mapping out launch strategies, Jenny spends time biking, camping, and being outdoors with her husband and three daughters.


IN THE CONVO:

  • Jenny's formula to keep the client as a priority in your messaging
  • The importance of an email campaign and how you can repurpose that copy  into online content
  • What "launching" is and how can you use it to boost your leads
  • Jenny's go-to tips for email writing during the launch phase


CONNECT WITH JENNY:
📸@jennyrothcopywriting
🌐www.jennyrothcopywriting.com
🎁Free sales page template & masterclass: https://hidden-bread-949.myflodesk.com/k7de3jpf4j

CONNECT WITH CARIN:
Hey CEO! Join us over at our new membership the Success Cellar 🍾 - exclusively for growth-minded wedding pros just like you!

🌟Write a review, share, and tag @celebrationpros for your first month free!
📸 - @celebrationpros
🌐 - www.carinhunt.com

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

MEET JENNY:
Jenny Roth is a sales copywriter for female-founded companies.

She believes good copy does more than make sales – it also leaves your clients feeling excited to work with you! Her copy continues to be the backbone of several multi-figure+ launches each quarter.

When she isn’t writing or mapping out launch strategies, Jenny spends time biking, camping, and being outdoors with her husband and three daughters.


IN THE CONVO:

  • Jenny's formula to keep the client as a priority in your messaging
  • The importance of an email campaign and how you can repurpose that copy  into online content
  • What "launching" is and how can you use it to boost your leads
  • Jenny's go-to tips for email writing during the launch phase


CONNECT WITH JENNY:
📸@jennyrothcopywriting
🌐www.jennyrothcopywriting.com
🎁Free sales page template & masterclass: https://hidden-bread-949.myflodesk.com/k7de3jpf4j

CONNECT WITH CARIN:
Hey CEO! Join us over at our new membership the Success Cellar 🍾 - exclusively for growth-minded wedding pros just like you!

🌟Write a review, share, and tag @celebrationpros for your first month free!
📸 - @celebrationpros
🌐 - www.carinhunt.com

Speaker 1:

Welcome back to the Celebration Pro podcast. Today we have Jenny Roth with us, and Jenny and I have crossed paths a couple of times. We've been trying our best to collaborate because she has such an outsider's perspective to bring to all of us here in the wedding industry and I think it's something that's important and something that can really be leveraged. So she likes to do copywriting and empowering the people that she speaks with her clients so that they can then use it in a way that essentially funnels a lead down to conversion. So this is going to be a really fun conversation. So, to tell you a little bit about Jenny again, she's a sales copywriter, primarily for female founded companies, and she believes that good copy makes does more than make sales it also leaves your clients feeling excited to work with you and.

Speaker 1:

I always say that like this industry is the exclamation point industry Like if there's something we can do to make our clients and our collaborators feel more excited, then we're all here for it. So, jenny, welcome to the show. Thank you so much for being here.

Speaker 2:

Hi, karen, thank you for having me. I'm so excited to be here and to speak with you and your audience. So, as a copywriter like you said I am also I feel kind of a kinship to your audience and wedding professionals because I'm also a service provider, right. So I get everything that you're saying about wanting to be that exclamation mark and maybe there's a lot of wedding professionals in your field and you want to stand out and connect with the people you want to work with. So I totally feel that in my own profession and so just really excited to talk with you today.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, this is going to be fun. So how did you? Can you tell us a little bit about, like your origin story? I've said it a million times on here we love a good origin story. We love hearing how entrepreneurs come to be, because a everybody's a little different, but I feel like we can always have that one relationship like meeting point where we feel like we can really resonate with each other. So if you could share your story, that would be amazing.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, of course, thank you. So yeah, today I am a website sales page and email copywriter and, like you said, I really believe in the power of writing that doesn't just sell your stuff but that really speaks to the people you want to work with and just welcomes them with open arms. I really believe, like I want your copy to be so good that people feel like zero buyers remorse when they sign up to work with you.

Speaker 2:

Um, and so I started as a magazine editor. I was a homeschooling, stay at home mom of three little girls. Um, I started pitching myself to local magazines to write articles on the side and I moved my way up to becoming the editor of one of those magazines. Um, fairly quickly, and as I was doing this, people are like the editor of one of those magazines. Fairly quickly. And as I was doing this, people are like, oh, you write things, I have this blog, I have this website, I have this other thing. And I was just saying yes, like sure, and on the meantime, googling like how do I do this Right? And so just kind of figuring it out as I went and also realizing that in this community magazine I was writing for, we would often feature business owners and we'd get these thank you letters Like thank you so much for doing this write-up on my company, on my business, on my brick and mortar store. We've gotten more traffic since, since the feature article you did and I was.

Speaker 2:

My parents are entrepreneurs, my husband is a farmer, he has his own business too, and so business owners has just been kind of close to my heart, and so I kind of was thinking if I can do something I love which is writing from home, still be here most of the time for my kids and that helps other people like I'm all in. And I realized it was copywriting, it's what it was called, and so I started to take every course, every program I could to learn more about it, to do it effectively. And so I've been doing this for four years full time. I started really small, you know. I just took like one client on per month when my kids were little. Now they're all in school and it's like my full-time thing. So that's kind of where I got to where I am today.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I love it. It's so nice when our passion is actually something that can be also a moneymaker to, to support the things that we care about the most in life. I remember in college, uh, I didn't know what I wanted to be or do, or I changed my major so many times and my best friend is like you'd be a really good party planner. And I'm like that's not a real thing. Like, and then, lo and behold, the college I was at had an event management track and I was like oh, wow, there's so much more to party planning. You know, like that's just like the smallest version of what you can do with events. Um, and yeah, so it really I just love you saying like, oh, it was called copywriting, right. Like you just have no idea. And then, once it's there, it's like well for us, let's do this. So I love that story. Yeah, I love that, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

So something that you are, that that you teach on and that you work on for your clients, is email marketing, and I always what I teach is word of mouth marketing, and I say word of mouth is number one, email marketing is number two, social media is number three. Like that's when that one's further down on the list than most of us realize. But email marketing can be so impactful because you have these people who are subscribing and they chose to subscribe and they chose to not unsubscribe, right Like so. Those are the people who actually are excited to hear from you weekly and that sort of thing. I've been trying to influence the wedding industry to run more with email marketing. So I'd love to hear a little bit about your take on email marketing and then maybe we can go into um what it looks like to write those emails and what topics might be a good fit for our industry.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, of course. So my take on email marketing is there. Everyone you talk to would tell you you should start your email list. You better start your email list. Instagram can disappear tomorrow. Get on that email list.

Speaker 2:

And we feel a lot of pressure as business owners to build this email list, and it can be hard, especially if you don't prefer writing, if you feel like you're better on video or speaking on a podcast or in some other way, and so I totally get that, and so I always tell people I don't believe that you, quote need email marketing If it is something that you sit down to and you're like I just hate this, I don't like doing this, I'm not good at this.

Speaker 1:

So when you come at it from that kind of energy, um, you won't stick with it, right, like if it's not fun you won't be consistent with it If you, if you don't feel like you're doing a good job, you'll just feel defeated, right, and so I'm not doing your list of favor either, cause you're probably not like writing it as your best self.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, totally, you're probably not sending great emails, right? So I think, like, my first take on email marketing is first of all, you can repurpose things everywhere. So maybe you start with a blog or a podcast or a carousel, like whatever feels really good to you. You can repurpose it into email. So I myself, I'm a writer. I feel more comfortable writing. I write to my email list first and then I put a blog title on it, put it on my blog. Sometimes I record that blog post as a podcast episode and then I'll put it on the Instagram. So you can repurpose a lot of different ways and kind of just make email a natural extension of what you're already good at and what you're already doing. So my, like, my first take on email marketing is make it your own. If you love sending videos and talking, you can embed videos to your email list and they will love it.

Speaker 2:

I have emails that do that and they love it. Right, if you? Another thing my other take on it is to just be really patient with yourself. It's so hard to, you know, go on Instagram and see like 50% open rate and 70% click rates and people like all these things, when the truth of the matter is is like that's not how every email is going to be. So just be patient with yourself and start. The more emails you write, the better you will get at writing emails. So I guess that's kind of my take on it is be patient with yourself, weave it into what you're already doing and kind of come at it from not the energy of like oh my gosh, I have to do this, but like I'm going to give this a try and see if I can make this a profitable part of my business.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I find it like a game, like I'll do like a month of emails, right, and then I'm like, okay, which one did the best? Like I'm really excited to go back and see, okay, which would have the best conversion rate, let's try and do something similar to that next month and see if it does as well. And it's again and I've been saying this in a few recent episodes and and just in conversations that it's so important to look at the data that you have within your business and this just gives you another extension of very important data that you can pull from and see what's working and what's not and what people are most excited about that you're talking about.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I agree with that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah and uh. So the next part of this question is what topics you know we're here in the in the wedding industry. I mean, there's so many different ways we can go, so sometimes that can be paralyzing when there's too much to talk about. What topics do you think would be most engaging for us to be writing about for our consumers, which are primarily couples, sometimes other wedding collaborators and vendors too?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, such a good question. So when you write an email to kind of simplify it right from the top, especially as a wedding professional or a service provider of any kind just always remember that, like we call it the rule of one in copywriting. So make sure you're writing to one reader about one topic and you have one call to action, Like you're asking them to do one thing For me. I find it helpful to just lay out those three rules of one right away so I'm really clear, Like I remember this is who I'm talking to, this is my topic for today, and if you get off track and it feels like it's too long and you have way too many topics, that's a good thing. Just pull those things out and that's another email, yeah, and one call to action. I often start with the call to action because when I know, oh yeah, I'm inviting people to my free event, then if I know where I'm going, it's kind of easier for me to build from there. So, as far as some topics that could be really fun to send to your email list or anywhere that you share content, really I like to share your process first of all. So it's kind of like, think about it. It's not what you do, but it's how you do it, and I even encourage people service providers to like name your process. Like if a client starts working with you from point, like from first contact all the way to the wedding is over, like what does that look like? So, step-by-step, share your process with your audience and kind of not just from the angle of like this is what I do, but and this is why I do it this is how my my couples benefit from it. This is why my couples love this kind of thing. This is how I save you time. This is, you know, whatever that looks like. So I think your process is a great topic to talk about. I also love the idea of, at the top of the month, sharing your calendar of events. So if you have vendors on your list or couples who maybe want to see you at an event local to them, they can just have your calendar events at the top of the month and kind of know where you're going to be speaking, where you're going to be at stuff like that, and they can connect with you. Another email that I like to do is opening up calendar time just to talk to couples or people on your list. So maybe at the top of the month you say, hey, I have five 30 minute spots to, like you know, have consultations with a couple or vendor. Um, no strings attached. Just if you have questions for me or want to learn more about me, let's connect over coffee. Um, I've had huge success with that.

Speaker 2:

On my email list, you can also share behind the scenes of what you're working on. I think it's also incredible to send emails about your last wedding and what you learned, right, what went well, what would you do differently next time All of those things. The clients can really get a feel that you're like. You're a real person, right, Like you show up and this is what you do to give the best experience, and they can really see that. You could also have a couple or a client take over your email list, which is really fun. So instead of just sharing like a testimonial from a from a couple, you could actually have them take over your list for the day and just talk to your subscribers.

Speaker 1:

So yeah, that's really fun.

Speaker 1:

I really liked the idea of the calendar for two reasons because there's different ways you can use it depending on what kind of vendor you are.

Speaker 1:

So, if you're, I was just working with a musician earlier this week and she does weddings and she does all these different events around town. So a lot of times the people that have hired her or are looking to hire her for a wedding, they'll go get to see her live, and so now she has this calendar of events she can share. But on the other hand, if you have, say, a wedding planner who doesn't have like events that she throws right she gets hired to. But how much fun would it be if you were either excited about possibly working with her or possibly, or maybe you're already a client and you got to see when and where the weddings are that they're hosting and maybe, like, one of those venues is the venue that you had your eye on and you can't wait to hear more about it, and then later in the month you get to see the behind the scenes through another email of that and it's almost like this storytelling, like you get to come along for the ride. I think that's brilliant. I love it.

Speaker 2:

I love that too. It's such a cool way. So it's kind of like goes back to the idea, like when in doubt, just document right Like this is where I'm going to be working, this is where I'm going to be at, this is what we did, and if you just kind of kind of takes the pressure off too and you feel like I'm just sharing what I'm working on throughout the month, I love that and I think your audience would love that too.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, I think this is great and you're giving me the rule of one, but it's hard, I'm like, but I have a whole week of things I want to share with them. So, yeah, definitely need to work on that myself.

Speaker 2:

It's a good problem to have I have that problem too and it's a good problem to have to just pull those out and be like actually I have five emails here, I don't just have one. So content done, I know.

Speaker 1:

So content done. I know, and we were talking about before we went live right, we were talking about how a lot of the people in the wedding industry haven't jumped onto the email marketing train or they're not comfortable with it, and so we were talking about other ways and other places that you would be able to take these same topics and implement them, you know, in things like blogs and other capacities. So I'm curious about, like your list and your thought process and where we can maybe utilize these topics in other ways.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, exactly, just like I was saying, I start with my email and then I go from there. But I'm, you know, an email person. So if you prefer to record a podcast episode and then repurpose that topic into an email, do what works for you. But I, yeah, well, essentially repurpose it everywhere. I'll write an email on any of the topics I just shared with you, or anything I'm writing about, and then I will also go post that email. I mean, you have to format it a little bit right. If I'm saying reply to this email, if you want to schedule a call on the blog, I'll say send me an email, right. Or in social media I'll be like send me a DM, but with just really minor adjustments, you can take your email and put it onto your blog and onto social. So and I'm a huge fan of repurposing things everywhere- I don't believe.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, to me it doesn't matter where people see it wherever.

Speaker 1:

I feel like your audience should be able to consume your content wherever it is most convenient for them, so yeah, yeah, and I always like to think that the content we put out whenever, especially when we're writing from our own hearts and and getting into it, it's just an extension of word of mouth, cause if you're the person behind the words, right it's. It's really getting people to understand what your brand values are, more about you and uh, and still attracting that person that we want to work with. So you know, all of that makes sense.

Speaker 2:

Um and and it relieves the stress of being like now I have to start this email list, because I think some people think like, well, I'm already posting on Instagram, I already have this podcast, I already do all these things and now I have to create email content. And I really just want to encourage people that it's not like you have to start creating all new content. You don't have to create just email content and then just social content and then just blog content. It can really be like just start with one piece of content per week, if you want, or every other week, whatever you have capacity for, and make it work for all your platforms that you want to be on, or just one platform. If you're on one platform, um, and then go for the.

Speaker 2:

I don't want you to think all my email content has to be totally unique. They don't get it anywhere else. It can be. It can be that way sometimes, or they can get the content first. If you want to make it exclusive, um, but it doesn't have to add to your plate. It can enhance what you're already doing.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, absolutely. I totally agree. Repurposing is like a magic wand sometimes. Well, you know, when we're talking about email marketing, you know I really encourage people to jump into that again because you're you're going to talk to people as much as you want and as long as you know, if they unsubscribe, then you know that that wasn't your person and you just have this entire audience in front of you that continues to follow along and it's really exciting.

Speaker 1:

But we want to make sure that we're not just telling stories, that where there's actually a goal behind it. And and oftentimes, of course, we have the call to actions, which might be like book, a discovery call, or, you know, check out our latest and greatest blog, or whatever it is. But something that we've, that Jenny and I have kind of fallen into the world of, is these launches, and it's launching a product or an event or something like that. And so, again, this is an industry that probably hasn't leaned into that so much, but there's so much power behind a good launch. So, jenny, could you explain or give an example of what a launch is, and then we'll kind of dive into that just a little bit.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, of course. So launching to me is just creating, like filling your calendar with projects. So as a wedding professional again, I relate to you so much because, as a copywriter, when I launch something, that's what I'm thinking of is I'm thinking of I have this done for you service, this service, and I want to fill my calendar for the next quarter, or maybe wedding professionals want to fill it for the next six months or a year, whatever that looks like.

Speaker 2:

So when you think of launching, for me that's just marketing content to fill your calendar with projects, marketing content to fill your calendar with projects. And so if you're doing this with email or with content, you know I kind of do it this way. So any launch, you know really you will have content that announces the service, Like hey, I am now booking this service, this is what it is, this is why it's incredible. You know this is when we're booking it's think of it as like cart open, like you can buy it now.

Speaker 2:

You can fill it up now Some other really important things to include in your launch copy. Until your calendar is filled as far as you want it to be filled would be I call it the red carpet offer tour. So like hey, I have this service.

Speaker 2:

Here's what's included and here's why all these steps matter to you, my client um, answer any objections people have, right? So if you think about the most common um as a wedding professional, people come to you and they they're like I want to work with you but answer all of those but don't ignore them. Just remember all those times you've kind of had those conversations and just pull them out in an email, um, and in your content in your content and just talk people through it, address that elephant in the room and show people how working with you can really solve those objections. Share a lot of case studies, a lot of clients, past clients you've worked with and what happened, like we were talking about before behind the scenes stuff like that, projects you've done in the past. And I also think it's really important when you're launching your services to have a way for your future clients to ask you questions.

Speaker 2:

So that looks different for every business owner. It could be reply to my email with your questions. It could be come to my live Q&A. It could be. Here's my calendar. I have open spots like get in touch with me.

Speaker 2:

Here's my FAQ part on my website, whatever that looks like the answer questions. Take the most common questions. You get answered on the emails, answer them in your content, um, and I think yeah, and of course there's other things, like what you teach Karen on just talking to people. So anytime I'm launching a service and I want to fill out my calendar, I will reach out to past clients, past couples If you're in the wedding industry and be like, hey, I'm looking to fill my calendar for these next six months, do you know one or two people who who would maybe love to work with me? Um, follow up with conversations you've had in the past, reach out to partners and vendors and same. It's so simple. Like, I'm looking to fill my calendar, you know one or two people, um, so, as you're making your content, also doing that behind the scenes kind of relationship building, having conversations with people. That's kind of how I go about a launch.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, I love that we were. Actually I was at a networking meeting last night. It's a new association down here in the Florida Keys where I'm at and she's trying to tap into. There's a few different islands down here and they all kind of have a different perspective on business and so she's chatting with me. I'm like, yeah, I mean, you have, you know, marathon, isla Morada, key Largo, they all again just have a different mindset.

Speaker 1:

And oh, where was I going with this? Oh, I was saying how let's look at like Key Largo may not be interested because of X Y Z, isla Morada might not be interested because of X Y Z. So we have to speak to those. So how do we show them that the value is greater than the objection? And, yeah, those are, those are always fun problem solving exercises in business, just being able, because once you have the objection it's harder for somebody to say no. And if they like you cause you build the like no trust there, all of the emails and storytelling you do, it's more likely that they click, which we love.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and I think people I love that point and I think people just appreciate it when it's kind of like you empathize with them. You're like you might be feeling this doubt about hiring me for this service, and then just coming in and being like and just like, yeah, they are feeling that. It's like yeah, and you can start your email, as simple as that. Like maybe you want to work with me in XYZ capacity, but you're feeling ABC, right, Whatever the rejection is, here's how. And then just come in and show how you would overcome that when you worked with them, Right? So just kind of you.

Speaker 1:

And so okay. So we've talked about email marketing, we've talked about how we can repurpose, we've talked about using email to create a launch for a product, that where we want to try and fill in some goals that are coming up ahead, and how to really connect with the clients. So I've loved that we've touched on that. So from here, just continuing, I guess, with the launch, what are some go to tips for actually writing those emails specifically so that people can maybe, you know again, get started? I don't know, do you start with a full sequence or walk us through what that looks like?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, this is such a good question. So I guess my main tip for writing emails during your launch phase is to come in with that way to you can let them know like I'm going to be emailing you more lately as we fill our calendar. If you are not getting married in the next year but you still want to stay on my email list or whatever, click here and you don't have to receive these emails, so you can do that. But I think my best tip is just coming at it and being like, hey, this is what I'm feeling and letting people know what to expect. I think people on your email list really appreciate that and after you do that, to just not be afraid to email your list more than once a week, email them three times a week, email them more than that If you have things to say, and not to be afraid of unsubscribes and lower opens and click rates when you are launching, because when you're launching, you're talking to one specific person.

Speaker 2:

You're not just sending this email to everybody on your list, whether they're kind of just watching you or whether they're ready to buy your. You're talking right to the people who are ready to buy. So expect lower opens and and lower click rates in the launch. I don't think that's talked about enough, that it's unsubscribes, right, because if people are like, oh actually, I'm, I'm not booking a wedding or I'm not, you know, this is not me, they will, they will unsubscribe and that's okay. They'll come back if they're ready to work, if and when they are ready to work with you. It's like not not that you email people too much or that you said the wrong thing or that you're being too pushy. Only reason is just, it's so just coming at it with that mindset of, yeah, being really open with your list, expecting these things to happen during the launch. The launch is launching. People are unsubscribing, the people who are there are still reading and clicking and that's all that really matters.

Speaker 2:

Right, following that rule of one. So don't answer all objections and all questions in one like mega email. Just keep your emails. One objection per email, one question per email, one case study per email. I think that's really important. And also following up with people. If you have somebody on your email list who is like opening all your emails, maybe clicking on a lot of your emails, I think it is totally within best practice to say, hey, um, I'm filling the service and I noticed you've been following along. I'm just curious, like are you booking, or are you interested in booking, or do you have questions for me? Do you like talking to call? So making it really personal, um, and that just not being afraid to send the email, I think is an, announced that you have this thing. I think it's the most important thing you can do.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and what's what's neat about email marketing is that you can have different sets of lists. So you can have maybe newsletter goes out to everybody, right? Whoever's subscribed to anything, they get the newsletter. And then you have another one that's specific to the launch, that they can click here If they're not getting married in the next year, or they can click here if they're not interested in X Y Z, if they're not getting married in the next year, or they can click here if they're not interested in X Y Z. And I think that's so smart because they can still hear from you, right, they're still part of the newsletter, but they're just not a part of that one um, that one list specifically. And so you can do multiple lists, which is which can be really fun too.

Speaker 1:

Um, and aside from that, it's oh, I keep losing my train of thought because I had another really good thought too, but it's just, it's such a powerful way to stay engaged and, oh, with the unsubscribers, it's just another data point to be able to look back and say, okay, I have, you know, three things that I launched this year.

Speaker 1:

Let's go back and see who, where did we have the most unsubscribers and why was that? Like, were they just unsubscribing because they weren't getting married, or were they unsubscribing to everything? And then I also find that a lot of them still follow on, like Instagram or social media. They're still watching and a lot of times they'll end up being subscribers again at some point in time. So yeah, when it comes to unsubscribe, I always like to see who's unsubscribing, just so that I can, like, go and check out what they're doing in their business and that kind of thing it's. It just gives me a little bit more insight. But yeah to never to. To know that not everyone is is the right client right now, and that's okay. So yeah.

Speaker 2:

It's so important when it comes to unsubscribes to think about that, and I mean it only makes sense the more emails you send and the more opens and clicks you get, the more unsubscribes you're going to get too, and like again, the only reason people unsubscribe is because they just are not ready for that offer or service.

Speaker 2:

They don't need it right now. And I've had similar things, karen, where I've seen, like past clients, I've worked with unsubscribe from my email list and I've just had like complete, you know what did I say wrong, you know? And then six months later they hire me, right. It's like they just unsubscribe because they it's they don't need this right now and when they're ready to work with you, like they'll come back. So just don't take it personally. I don't think it's anything that like you did wrong. It's nothing like that at all, right.

Speaker 1:

Right. So no, this was, this was all great. I hope it gives a little bit of a peek for all of you listening in as to how email marketing can really be beneficial. And you can even do two you can do a list for your collaborators and a list for the couples that you already have, and another list for the leads, and I know that that sounds like a lot right, but this is where we start talking to our team and maybe seeing if other people might be able to come in and help you.

Speaker 1:

Write where you can reach out to Jenny and she can help you understand how to manage, you know, an email marketing list effectively, because the idea is we want to have these people that are in front of us be able to convert into clients or refer a client to us. So it's very, very powerful, and anybody who's like, oh, email's dead. It is definitely not. We're all in our email boxes every day, so I know everyone listening can feel that. Well, jenny, this was amazing. Are you ready to go through a couple of more like personal Q and A?

Speaker 2:

Yes, I am. I want to add one more thing too about the segment about the segmenting.

Speaker 2:

So I am the most lazy segmenter you will ever meet. I have like one segment. I have like one segment for everybody on my list, um, and so you know, if you're launching something too and you're like I don't want to build out these segments, you'd be surprised. People maybe just want to follow along with what you're doing. So I keep it really simple. I'm just like I'm launching this thing. Thank you for being here. You know we'll go back to normally scheduled emails when the launch is done, um, so I don't want people to feel like they have to over segment either, because I don't know, you don't have to.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I agree, a lot of times I'll just email everybody the same information because it can be too much to manage Um, but I it also. I guess it just depends on, like, what it is you're sending to Um. But even in the wedding world, like if you have a promotion for you know, summer's just around the corner, maybe you have a summer 11 promotion that you're going to be throwing out um to the world and send it to vendors and couples already, like because you never know who it is that says, oh, I actually have a couple who would be interested in this. Like everybody knows somebody who's getting married. So certainly just having the one list I think is beneficial, this is beneficial.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's such a good point.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, for sure. Thank you for pulling that one back. Okay, are we ready? Well, I guess the first question is about business, but that's okay. Jenny, what is the last thing that you bought for your business?

Speaker 2:

Oh, I love this. I wish I had a cooler answer for you. I do put like candles on my business card for my office, but I sold it probably a candle from dirt road candle company. She's incredible homemade candles. So yeah, she's awesome and she a product-based business who uses email marketing really, really well. Side note so, and then also I just upgraded my subscription to I use a service called Podia to host my email template membership and I want to start doing affiliate marketing with my email list, and so that's new for me and you have to upgrade to the pro level, so I made the weave.

Speaker 1:

I love that. I'm going to check out the candle company.

Speaker 2:

So I've been getting more into.

Speaker 1:

I don't know if I'd say I'd be getting more into. I'm just using the oils that I have right now and my diffuser, but I really love having like a live flame and I find like I'll go to the grocery store and it'll be like BOGO candles, cause we don't have a lot here so and they just they give me a headache the way they smell. So when I can get like a really nice handmade, like oil-based candle, I just it makes my day. So I'm going to check them out.

Speaker 2:

She's incredible. It is like um headache, free sense. I think she calls it like sense. It's really good yeah.

Speaker 1:

So funny. No, I love that Okay, and then the next question is what is your favorite season and why?

Speaker 2:

Um, my favorite season is definitely summer because I, when you told me you live in Southern Florida, I got like major envy. Um, I live in South Dakota. Winter is very real here and I love the weather, so summer all the way.

Speaker 1:

So your husband farms. We're going to go to side bar here.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Your husband is a farmer, so how much of the year can he farm? Or maybe he farms something that like lives all year, I don't know.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, no they. They plant in the spring and harvest in the fall and they don't grow anything in the winter. But a lot of people, um folks here do farming and ranching, so they have cattle as well. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

I was going to say so. No, live animals on your farm.

Speaker 2:

He does it, my father, my dad does I uh, I grew up raised by a cattle farmer, so yeah, I love that.

Speaker 1:

My best friend lives in North Georgia and they have a miniature farm and she gets goats and all of that and I'm just like I live vicariously through everything she does. So fun, Very fun. I love it. And then the last question would be I ask everybody this in one year which today well, tomorrow is Valentine's day, so this will be an easy one to remember. So, one year from today, if you and I are popping a bottle of champagne to celebrate you, what are we celebrating?

Speaker 2:

Oh, it's so cool. I'm going to remember you next year on Valentine's day. That's so cool. I am. You know, I'm really terrible about celebrating is hard for me. Every coach I ever had in business is like what are you celebrating? What are the wins? Because I my tendency is to just plow through onto the next thing.

Speaker 1:

What could?

Speaker 2:

have been better. I did okay, but it could have been better, right, and so one thing I've started to do is, at the end of every workday, is write down five wins, like five little celebrations whether that's yeah.

Speaker 2:

I mean just small things, Like I got my inbox answered, all the messages answered, or I really enjoyed my cup of coffee today, and so one year from now, I hope that I am continuing this practice and seeing like just the miracle of business, like it literally to me a miracle seems extreme and dramatic, but it is like that you get to run your own company and make your own schedule. I just want to keep celebrating all those little tiny things every day. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

I mean, it's little miracles that got us to find, like, to have the the light go off and say, hey, here's your passion. Like is it right. And it's like you look back and you look at all the steps that got you to the point where you're like, oh, it's copywriting, right, and it's like it feels like some kind of destined path. So I love that. I think that's so sweet. Well, jenny, can you tell everybody where they can find you? And if you have anything else coming up, please share that as well.

Speaker 2:

Of course. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me. This has been wonderful. I am at JennyRothCopywritingcom and that's my Instagram handle as well. On there I have and we can maybe put this in the show notes, I don't know I have a free email marketing calendar and template collection, some of the topics that we talked about today and a calendar that shows you how to rotate through these six emails month after month. So if you are just kind of diving into the world of email marketing and you're like I don't know what to say or when or what to talk about, this freebie is really helpful because you get some ideas, the template to help you write them if you're totally stuck and don't want to do it from scratch, and just kind of a mini training on an email marketing strategy.

Speaker 1:

I love that. What um, just before we jump off, what uh email marketing platform do you prefer?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I use flow desk and I've had wonderful luck with them. Um, most of the clients who I write for as a copywriter use convert kit.

Speaker 1:

And so.

Speaker 2:

I yeah, I would recommend. I don't know how you feel about convert kit. I would recommend them to anybody and I've also had wonderful luck with Flowdesk as well.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, okay, so we'll we'll sidebar. I'm interested to hear how you like Flowdesk, but again, jenny thank you so, so much.

Speaker 1:

This has been really fun and, again, I think this is an enlightening and a newer conversation for our industry. And, you know, even if just five of you listening take off with this, like the thing, the way that makes us feel to be able to bring something new to the table, or to bring some information that inspires you all and to see you do well with it just, you know, makes our day. So, be sure, if you love this, or you think that you know somebody who would love, you know starting an email list, or you want to collaborate to do an email list, you know, be sure to share this episode and make sure to follow Jenny over on Insta. Thank you, jenny, thank you.

Copywriting and Email Marketing Strategy
Effective Email Marketing Strategies for Business
Content Repurposing and Email Marketing Launches
Effective Email Marketing Strategies
Email Marketing and Farming Chats
Email Marketing Strategies and Platforms