Celebration Pro Podcast

#74: How to Craft Irresistible Sales Pages for Wedding Services with Prerna Malik

April 29, 2024 Carin Hunt Season 1 Episode 74
#74: How to Craft Irresistible Sales Pages for Wedding Services with Prerna Malik
Celebration Pro Podcast
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Celebration Pro Podcast
#74: How to Craft Irresistible Sales Pages for Wedding Services with Prerna Malik
Apr 29, 2024 Season 1 Episode 74
Carin Hunt

MEET PRERNA:
Co-founder of Content Bistro, and creator of the wildly popular, strategy-first copywriting program — Ready-to-Sell ™ Prerna Malik is a Copyhackers-certified conversion copywriter. ,,She uses her proprietary Conversion Brew ® process for writing conversion-rich, coercion-free emails that balance persuasion AND personality while blending sales strategies seasoned with integrity. ,,ALL of this ensures you get the ROI your business deserves.,,She has written for over 500 clients including industry icons such as Pat Flynn, Amy Porterfield, Joanna Wiebe and countless others. And clients have seen results like 7-figure launches and 6-figures in recurring revenue. ,,If you need her after work hours, you can find her introverting with her nose in a book, baking up a storm in the kitchen, or traveling the world with her husband and business partner, Mayank, and their daughter, Manini.

IN THE CONVO:

  •  What copywriting is and how/where it is used in business.
  • Are sales pages relevant for wedding pros?
  • Examples of sales copy that help to convert leads to bookings!
  • Common copywriting mistakes or red flags to be aware of.


CONNECT WITH PRERNA:
📸 @contentbristro
🌐 https://contentbistro.com/
🎁Amplify Your Sales: https://contentbistro.com/amplify/

CONNECT WITH CARIN:
Hey CEO! Join us over at our new membership the Success Cellar 🍾 - exclusively for growth-minded wedding pros just like you!

🌟Write a review, share, and tag @celebrationpros for your first month free!
📸 - @celebrationpros
🌐 - www.carinhunt.com



Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

MEET PRERNA:
Co-founder of Content Bistro, and creator of the wildly popular, strategy-first copywriting program — Ready-to-Sell ™ Prerna Malik is a Copyhackers-certified conversion copywriter. ,,She uses her proprietary Conversion Brew ® process for writing conversion-rich, coercion-free emails that balance persuasion AND personality while blending sales strategies seasoned with integrity. ,,ALL of this ensures you get the ROI your business deserves.,,She has written for over 500 clients including industry icons such as Pat Flynn, Amy Porterfield, Joanna Wiebe and countless others. And clients have seen results like 7-figure launches and 6-figures in recurring revenue. ,,If you need her after work hours, you can find her introverting with her nose in a book, baking up a storm in the kitchen, or traveling the world with her husband and business partner, Mayank, and their daughter, Manini.

IN THE CONVO:

  •  What copywriting is and how/where it is used in business.
  • Are sales pages relevant for wedding pros?
  • Examples of sales copy that help to convert leads to bookings!
  • Common copywriting mistakes or red flags to be aware of.


CONNECT WITH PRERNA:
📸 @contentbristro
🌐 https://contentbistro.com/
🎁Amplify Your Sales: https://contentbistro.com/amplify/

CONNECT WITH CARIN:
Hey CEO! Join us over at our new membership the Success Cellar 🍾 - exclusively for growth-minded wedding pros just like you!

🌟Write a review, share, and tag @celebrationpros for your first month free!
📸 - @celebrationpros
🌐 - www.carinhunt.com



Speaker 1:

Welcome back my Celebration Pros. We are getting into a conversation today that I actually just said this off the air, that this is so needed in our industry, because we're often feeling stuck about how to get that passionate message that we have inside of us out into the world. And so today I have Prerna Malik, who is the co-founder of the Content Bistro. I have Prerna Malik, who is the co-founder of the Content Bistro. She is the creator of the wildly popular Strategy First copywriting program, Ready to Sell, which is a and she's also a copyhacker, certified conversion copywriter. I mean, that basically tells me that you know what to say. You know what to say. You know how to pull this in. In fact, you pulled me in when you originally applied to be on the podcast. So, Karina, I'm so excited to have you here and to jump into all the juiciness. So thank you so much for coming on.

Speaker 2:

Thank you so much for inviting me. I am just so excited to be here and to chat about all things copy with you and help all our listeners here who are extremely talented vetting professionals, so I just can't wait to get into it, yeah absolutely.

Speaker 1:

Can you tell us a little bit about how you got into this space? I mean we're looking at? You've done so much so I read her bio. So she's written over 500. She's written for over 500 clients, including Pat Flynn, amy Porterfield, joanna Weave, like I. I'm looking at some of like seven figure launches. Like there's some big numbers and big names. You know, in all of this and as entrepreneurs, we're hoping to one day, you know, be working with the greats or be reaching whatever success means to us. Can you tell us your story about how you started into copywriting, how you've gotten to where you are now? All right?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely. So it's going to be a little long because we've been in business since 2011. You know, I've been doing this for a very long time now, and when I say we, something that everyone should know is that my husband and I, we work together in our business. We work together at Content Bistro. We always have. We started in 2011. And the other thing that you all should know is that, well, we live in India and have lived here ever, you know, for forever, pretty much.

Speaker 2:

So when we started essentially you know it was it started more as a social media management and content creation business content creation business and then we had clients ask us for copy like the same clients who we were writing you know blog posts for and social media content for. They were like okay, you know, I have I'm launching a cookbook or I'm launching a membership or I'm launching a new service. Would you be able to write you know a sales page for that? And I love writing, I absolutely love writing, and the fact that I basically get paid to do that every day is literally, you know, I'm like living my dream right now. So when they were like okay, could you write sales pages for us? Could you write emails for us. I was like sure, because you can always. You know you can learn this and you can.

Speaker 2:

You know the internet makes it so much easier for us to be able to get the skills that we need, and that is when I started learning about writing copy reading books, you know, just visiting sites, taking courses and all of that and yeah, that's pretty much how I started writing copy.

Speaker 2:

The good thing is that I got really, really good at a process that works really well for conversions for our clients, which is what led to not just us getting booked out really fast, but also us working with some incredible clients all over the world. I invested, like I said, I invested a lot in training and learning. So I invested in learning from copy hackers, being certified by them and then writing for them as well. So it was like a whole full circle moment indeed, and just over the years, ensuring that you know, not only do our clients get great results from the copy of the ride, but also, you know, a great client experience and a complete approach in terms of sales strategy and sales copy, so that they get a huge ROI on the, you know, on the investment they're making in working with us. That's what's kind of helped us not just build this business but also ensure that you know we can show up every day and do the work. That lights us up.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, and you're talking to an industry that had a thought out of a passion, that built a business right. So I know that there are heads nodding along saying I understand what you mean, mike, let's live the dream. This is amazing. Well, congratulations on taking your passion and turning it into this. You know little empire that you and your husband have created overseas. So what time is it over? Where you are in India right now.

Speaker 2:

Well, it's eight 40 in the evening.

Speaker 1:

How crazy is that? It's, you know, is we all live in the same time, right, but we don't, and it's, you know. But I love this and it had me thinking it. Just I got this picture of and I know this might sound kind of weird, but almost like hocus pocus, where you have, you know this, the magic that's happening and you're throwing all the words right. They have to say all the words and put the strategy together and then, once it all comes together, that's when the magic happens. So, as you were talking I don't know why, but this is what came into my mind, but it's really where the magic is.

Speaker 1:

I'm actually working on a sales page myself, so I'm going to. A little bit of this is going to be selfish for me today, but we're going to, I'm going to two part. This, which is not the question I gave you, but I you'll be able to answer, it is what is copywriting and what is a sales page? Because we're working with, we're working with professionals who have been taught their entire lives. You have three packages. They go under your service page and that's, that's the end of it, like, um, and I think that the world of sales pages has really shifted. So copywriting and sales pages, what are we looking at?

Speaker 2:

Sure, great questions, both of them, the combination of story, science and strategy to help your audiences, to help your ideal prospects, make informed decisions. You want to share your story, your system, your process. You want to share science. You want to use science so conversion, science, persuasion, science, psychology. Want to use science so conversion, science, persuasion, science, psychology. And then you also want to use good, old-fashioned sales strategy.

Speaker 2:

All of this comes together when you're writing copy. So copy is not just, you know, just putting fancy words on a page. Copy is thoughtful, intentional, nuanced. Copy should do the heavy lifting when it comes to selling your services to people who are perfect fits for you. So that is copywriting in a nutshell. And a sales page is a page that you would write so your ideal clients, your perfect fit prospects, can make that informed decision. A sales page is a page you would use copywriting for.

Speaker 2:

So when someone visits your site, whether you're selling hair and makeup or you're selling you know vetting photography or event planning, or you know floral arrangements, it does not matter. But the point is, when someone visits your site, your sales page is where they would find not only how you can help them, but why should they choose you, why should they hire you? What is it that sets you apart from everybody else? Because we know that when people are planning a wedding, they're looking at more than one window. So how do you set yourself apart? And for most wedding professionals, your services page should actually be a sales page. It should do the. It should do the heavy lifting of helping your prospects see you as the best choice for them.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and I see time and time again I'm guilty of it from when I was wedding planning where it's like here's low, middle, high ticket offers yeah and here are the line items of what's included, and maybe there's like a paragraph about how much we love wedding planning, right and if none of it actually is speaking to the client, or or helping them get over the objections they might have over time or stress or whatever it might be yeah, it's a whole new ball game absolutely, because you know, and here's the thing, it's not, it's not no one's fault if you currently have like a services page which has you know what you said, which has like the three packages and a brief section about you know why you love vetting planning, but because until now and until very recently, you know, like you said, the, a website was home about services and yes, contact right

Speaker 2:

exactly, yeah. So but what we all need to realize is it's becoming really really hard for A people to stand out in niches that are getting really competitive really fast and B. Our audience, our clients, our prospects are wanting more information, but delivered in a way that's easy for them to understand and in a way that they can see that, okay, I have everything I need to know in order to make an informed decision about who to go with, and here's why this wedding planner is better than this wedding planner. So we need our websites to do a better job at selling our services so we can increase those bookings, we can increase those conversions, and that's where a sales page comes in. Conventionally, a sales page is associated with oh, if you're selling an online course, or if you're selling a digital product, or if you're selling, maybe, a physical product, but the point is, services need to be sold. So why would you not want a sales page for your services?

Speaker 1:

Absolutely no, that was it, and that was a beautiful description of what it is, how it can serve us, and I very much appreciate that Cause, like I said, I'm in the depths of sales page world right now and I found that this is, this is all new territory and, for those listening in, if you don't remember, from the very beginning of this conversation, all of the education and research that Prerna had to do to be prepared to deliver copy for sales pages, it's, it's not something that everybody knows, this is something that you can, it's a learned skill, you know, and this is why we have people like Perna. For those of us who don't have time for that learned skill, we can reach out and say help, sos, right. So, perna, where else can we use, you know, aside from our sales page? Where else are we using copy for our business?

Speaker 2:

So, put very simply, you want to use copy anywhere in your business where your audience needs to decide whether or not to hire you. So, like I said, your website, of course, your emails, if you're sending out emails, which you totally should be. If you're not, you know that's another conversation we should be having.

Speaker 2:

And, of course, your social media too. They all need copywriting. They all need good, solid, conversion copywriting principles in place. So again you know, the goal is the same. What's the goal for your website? Help your prospects make a decision. What's the goal for your emails? Help those prospects make a decision. What's the goal for your social? Help your prospects make a decision. So, if the goal is the same, why aren't we using copywriting on all of these places?

Speaker 1:

I mean it goes down to your business card, exactly, exactly, yeah, anything anywhere that you're talking about your business. That's where it should be 100%, and I love that you said you should. Everyone should be in emails. I 100% agree. Email marketing is not dead, it is alive. And kick it.

Speaker 2:

Okay, yeah, so so alive. And you know, I think it's, it's super important for writing professionals to leverage their, their email lists and they can do that in so many ways. But, like I said, like I'm sure, yeah, that's another, that's another day, yeah, I ways.

Speaker 1:

But, like I said, I'm sure you know yeah, that's another conversation, we'll just mention that another day. Yeah, I know, but I just had to say I agree on that one. So we know what the sales page is, we know why we should have one. We know everywhere else, that you know pretty much everywhere else. Right, we should be having our copy. Um, how can we use, how can we leverage this copywriting? How? What are the things that say you're auditing a sales page? This?

Speaker 1:

might be the easier way to say we're auditing a sales page, what are some of the types of language that we can use? Or where can we take our personal copy to leverage it to help said client decide to click the buy now button?

Speaker 2:

So I think the best way for me to answer that would be to kind of walk it through my process essentially. For me to answer that would be to kind of walk you through my process essentially so you know our audience can see how to approach writing a sales pitch. Because, like I said earlier, writing copy is not about, you know, just plopping words on a page. Writing copy is intentional and thoughtful. So let me just kind of explain the intention and thought part of that before we kind of look at okay, so what should go on a sales page maybe? So you want to start by first understanding who your prospect is, who your ideal, perfect, fit client is, and when I say that I don't just mean in terms of demographics. So if you're not just saying, oh, you know, lives here, this age, you know, is looking to plan a wedding around this time, what we want to look at is what are they saying when they're talking about their experiences while looking for a window? So you ideally want to go back to people who did hire you and speak with them. You know what was going through their mind when they were looking to say, if you're offering, say, photography services, you want to know what? What was going through their mind when they were looking at different photographers? Um, what helped them make a decision? What were their big hesitations? What were they worried about? What were some of the? You know the nightmare stories they've heard from other friends who you know may have gotten married around the same time and we're looking at. So you want to really get into the minds of your, of your perfect fit audience. You want to really understand where they're coming from, what's worrying them, and then, of course, you want to that's part of the story side of things. You know that kind of helps you understand the whole, the story that your audience has, the story that your audience has, the story that your audience is listening to or that's playing in their minds. And then you also want to use your story. So what makes you different? You know what's your process like, what sets you apart from everybody else. So I'll give you an example. I wrote a services sales page for a bridal hairstylist. I wrote a services sales page for a bridal hairstylist and one of her key things was that she would only book one wedding at a time so that you would get her complete attention. You know that was part of her process. She would not be, you know, booking more like multiple weddings at the same day, so she's not going from one place to another place. She was just focused on you. So you felt like this is my day, that kind of a thing, and we really brought that out in her copy because that was her point of difference. So you want to use that. That's the story side of things.

Speaker 2:

Then you also want to use, like I said, you want to use conversion signs, you want to use sales strategy For those things. You want to lean on things like so what do other people who've hired you in the past have to say about your services? Um, what do, um, how do you compare against other options that they may be considering? Why not just, you know, address that conversation that they may already be having in their heads? You know, oh, but how about this one? So you just want to kind of address those conversations.

Speaker 2:

So you want to use conversion science and persuasion to help your audience see that, okay, not only is does she get me, but she also compares against others like this, she's also trusted by other you know people like me.

Speaker 2:

So you want to use, you want to like kind of blend all of that. So I start with a lot, a lot of research into into the audience that we're looking to speak to. I look at you know what makes you really different from everybody else? I do. I do a bunch of research into who are. You know. Main competition is we don't, you know and I know everyone says no that I don't have competition. But trust me, you do. So you want to get you know, spend some time kind of digging into that and seeing how you compare against them. I look at things like oh, what are some of the questions that they may have? Because you want to address those in the copy, you know. So all of that research goes into you finding the words that would make the most impact on your prospect when they're looking to make a decision as important as hiring someone for what's probably going to be the most special day of their life.

Speaker 1:

Something that I used to ask. I would ask it on the front end. Before a client would even book, or a couple would even book, I would say, um, have you spoken with any other wedding planners? I was a wedding planner back in the day, and so I would say have you spoken with any other wedding planners? You don't have to tell me who they are, I'm just curious what has stood out to you, what have you liked, what have you not liked? Cause then it's so much easier to drive that conversation towards the positives. Um, so I would do that on the front end and then such a good back end, not even on the back end, on the back end of the onboarding.

Speaker 1:

So this isn't like when wedding day's over, this is okay, they said, yes, I would ask, why did you decide to go with us? And you can ask that again down the line, but when it's fresh and they've just decided that that question is going to be so much more honest than them trying to like, dig up that emotion from like 12 months ago, um, and then you can take that right and you can put it into maybe it was because I felt like you were going to make a stress-free experience. Right, that's clearly what your clients want. Throw it in your cup.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely Absolutely. So you know, for instance again, to kind of go back to like examples so, for instance, with another bridal hairstylist, what I found was, you know, her clients would say that, you know, you give me, you hear me out, you know you pay attention to what I'm saying when I'm sharing examples, when I'm sharing, you know what kind of a look I want. So you just go ahead and grant my you know bridal hairstyle wishes and I was like, oh, that is, that is so cool and that is something that we definitely want to highlight as well. So, just simple things like this and you know these stand out because this is exactly what your prospect is thinking. So you want to go ahead to highlight that, you know. You want to go ahead and take care to mention that, not just on your sales page, but like you know, you want to go ahead and take care to mention that, not just on your sales page, but like you know we talked about your copy. Wherever you're using copy, you want to mention that.

Speaker 1:

So the process that I'm going through right now is, you know, and again, a lot, of, a lot of us have. Just here's my package, here's what's included, here's the price. And the process I'm going through right now is what's included is great, but we also have to say this is what's included and this is why it's important. And then, in the actual copy, leaning towards or leveraging their emotional side.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. So to to your point yes, you want to talk about what's included, so you want to say, yes, this includes a trial experience. But why is that important? You know why does? Why does it matter to your client? Because it'll help you find the perfect style for your big day. So you really want them to see that you're not just kind of putting in things because you know well that's what everybody else is doing. You want to help them see exactly what's the purpose behind everything that's included. So that's definitely something you want to keep in mind, Um, when you're writing your sales page. There are, of course, other elements as well, and we can kind of go through them.

Speaker 1:

There's a lot that goes into it. The other thing, too, is we often think that the couples know already, like, and oh, I had, and because you're talking about a hairstylist, I have a client right now. What does she call it? A hair and makeup preview. And to me I'm like, oh, is this like? I send you a picture of myself on AI and I get a preview. Like cause, that's the age we're in, Right?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I didn't understand what preview was. But if you said trial, I knew what that meant only because I'm in the industry. If I was a fresh bride looking to have hair and makeup done or groom right, and yeah, and I come in and I say I don't know what that is. I see it's included, but now I have to ask the question.

Speaker 2:

You have to make it like you didn't know you needed this right, this is the thing you didn't know you needed.

Speaker 1:

This right, this is the thing you didn't know you needed. And it was like when I was a wedding planner I would say, oh, I'll send you the BEOs, I'll send you this and that, and they'll be like whoa, whoa, rewind what is a BEO. And everyone is laughing because everybody here knows it. But it's banquet event order, right, and so we forget that we're. You almost have to, not in a condescending way, obviously, but you have to treat them like children and put it out in like weddings for dummies kind of verbiage, right?

Speaker 2:

Absolutely, you want to start with understanding. You don't want to start with any assumptions about your clients. You want to start with approaching this from the point of view of someone who and that's why research is so important, you know, because you want to start with really understanding where they're coming from. And maybe you know you're working with someone for whom you know this is this would be, yes, an exciting experience, but also a very overwhelming experience, because they've got so many decisions to make. How can you make it simpler for them? So, understanding exactly what's going on in their head when they're looking to make those decisions is so, so important. And never make any assumptions. Don't start with, don't start thinking that, oh, they would probably know what this is.

Speaker 1:

Chances are they won't, or some. There will be somebody along the lines, yeah, yeah doesn't understand it, or even if they know, like if they know what a first look is and they're not. They don't think that it's important, but because of the way you've written the copy, now again it's the thing they didn't know they needed and absolutely yeah, absolutely, because so when you write a sales page for your services, you know again you're.

Speaker 2:

It makes it really easy for your ideal prospect to see why you're the obvious choice for them. You know they, they see that, you know, yes, you've got, you've got the expertise, you've got the experience. And then what you've also done is you've got the expertise, you've got the experience. And then what you've also done is you've done that expectation setting for them. So they know you know what to kind of expect when they work with you. So they're not that again, it's really important that they make informed decisions. I'm huge on helping our prospects make informed decisions because it does not lead to any buyer's remorse later where or any you know like unpleasant experiences, where they're like, oh, but I thought I'm getting this, but no, you weren't. So we don't want it yeah.

Speaker 1:

So I know there's a few people listening in and they're like, oh, I've got this my my website. It speaks so well about me and social media is great, like they think they've got it all down. So for the, for those people and the people who are working to build their copy, what are some common mistakes or red flags that we might not even realize that we're doing?

Speaker 2:

Oh sure. So I would say I have. I have three. Look at if I were auditing your sales page to see whether it would convert or not.

Speaker 2:

The first is if it's too vague. So when I say too vague, it's copy that's not specific enough for your audience and we just covered a few examples of that. Specific enough for your audience, and we just covered a few examples of that. So if you say X, y, z, what does it really mean? What does it really do you want to be really specific about outcomes, about expectations, about results, about what they will get when they work with you. So what they will get when they work with you. So being too vague is something that I always look for and highlight and I'm a huge fan of being very specific.

Speaker 2:

The second is, to me, focused. So your copy should put your reader first. For example, again you know. Instead of saying first. For example, again you know. Instead of saying I'll be at the venue or I'll be the first one at the venue way before the guests arrive, so you don't have anything to worry about, you would want to say you'll find me at the venue even before so-and-so arrives, which means you don't have to worry about. You know the tables not being set up or the you know whatever, the photographer not being there. I'll be taking care of. You know everything, but you want to keep it more. You focused, you want to speak to them, you want them to see themselves in the words that you're putting on that page. So not, I've heard there's a ratio between I and you.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, you should have 80%. I don't know if that's what it is, but it's like way more you than I.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so you'll hear different kinds of ratios. You'll hear 7030,. You'll hear for every three eyes, you need six use and you know all of that. But that can get really complicated really fast and you, the last thing you want to be doing is counting.

Speaker 1:

Okay right, it doesn't have to be that strict, but yeah, it's a guideline thing you want to be doing is counting okay, right, it doesn't have to be that strict, but yeah, it's a guideline.

Speaker 2:

What you want to kind of remember I find that, um a good rule of thumb and this is after you, you know years and years of writing so much of copy is that you want to read the copy out loud. Once you've written it, and when you're reading it, you will find yourself, you know, noticing how often you're saying I'll do this, I'm this, I have this, I've done this Versus, you'll get this, you'll see, you'll find, and that automatically, kind of you know, helps you go. Okay, this is like way me focused. I need an edit. Another good way and this is for people who work with you know, coaches like yourself would be to get feedback from another pair of eyes and have them read it and see is it to me focused or is it, you know? Is there a healthy balance? And then the third mistake is like a hill that I will die on is when it's too templated.

Speaker 2:

So this is where you know we use copy and again, I know sometimes it's the need of the hour. We may not have the time or the budget or you know, or the know-how, so we go ahead, we get a website copy template. The problem with that is that everyone's sounding the same and what I love to say is because I have a brand that's kind of food based. So I always say you know, cookie cutters are for cookies, not for your copy. So that's a way to get our templates. You want you don't want to sound the same as everybody else. You know, and you want to speak to your audience. You want to highlight your story, you want to highlight your system, your processes and your personality, because this is a very relationship based business that you know wedding professionals are in. So you want to highlight your personality and that's so important and that'll only come out when you don't lean on a template. So yeah, the three things that I will watch out for is like too big too me focused, too templated.

Speaker 1:

I find that when I use a template cause I start with a template for everything. Right, I'm in Canva, I'm on show it like everything is. Oh, yeah, oh yeah, yeah, I untemplate, like I, I work in it so much that you'd have no idea that it was the original template. But I'm like I need that structure to start, yeah. And then I start, yeah, I start messing around with it. But I've gone onto websites and said, oh, that's this, I know that template. Like I recognize it from Exactly.

Speaker 2:

And there. So there is no, absolutely no harm in using a structure, because that just does speed up things. I have what I call recipes in in my Ready to Sell and I have recipes for everything from sales pages to email sequences, to opt-in pages, everything. And the idea of the recipe is that it gives you all of the steps so you know exactly what happens. But then you also have that freedom of mixing and matching things up, of using the words that your audience will pay attention to, and you're not just kind of filling in the blanks there, or yeah, so it just makes it easier and more effective. So, yeah, yes for structures, but not templates.

Speaker 1:

Are there any, and this could just be your course? Any, and this could just be your your course. But are there any tech tools that that you use in your business that you recommend often to others?

Speaker 2:

when writing sales pages. Yeah, so for sales pages essentially. Yes, I do have a lot of recipes that I do teach inside. You'll find a lot on our website as well. On the blog, I share a lot of copy, strategies and recipes and tutorials over there too.

Speaker 2:

But other than that, the one tool that I will say you should use once you've written your copy would be the Hemingway app. So it's Hemingway app, I think that's the URL, what you want to do, what that does yeah, it's called Hemingwayappcom. What this would do for you is you can take your copy and you can just put it into Hemingway app. It's a free tool, and that tool will tell you a lot of different things. It will tell you the grade level of the copy you've written. So if it's a very high grade level, like 9 or 10, that means it's very complex, and most of us want to aim for grade 5 or 6 to make it, you know, easily readable and understandable, exactly For, you know, for the average reader. It'll also point out things like oh, there are sentences complex and very hard to read, or are you using way too much passive voice instead of active voice? So it just helps you clean up your copy and make it way more stronger and tighter. Really quickly, really easily.

Speaker 1:

I love that. I haven't heard of this app, which is funny because I'm in Key Largo, so I'm in the Florida Keys. Key West, which is south of us, is Hemingway. You know city. So you said Hemingway and I'm like, oh, tell me more. No, I think that's such a powerful tool. Thank you for sharing that. This has been like a little copywriting and sales page 101 master course kind of deal. So thank you so much for all of these tidbits.

Speaker 1:

I hope the people that are listening in are seeing the power behind this, because when we're talking about conversion rates those your ideal client who is about to book but doesn't because your sales page isn't strong enough we don't want that to happen. We don't want you to lose the people that should be working with you. So, perna, thank you. This has been incredible.

Speaker 2:

Well, thank you so much for inviting me. Well, thank you so much for inviting me. Before we wrap up, I wanted to just quickly walk your listeners through a couple of sections that when they're writing their sales page, they want to ensure that it has these sections, so we aren't missing out on anything. Key sections. Besides, of course, you definitely want a really strong headline, hero section, and you want a very descriptive process section. Now, the process section is what would you know, set most service providers apart. So you would want to talk about you know what, what it looks like when people are working with you. You want to take them through the steps that you follow. So you know like we were talking about. It helps them understand the purpose and the value behind each.

Speaker 2:

It just kind of overcomes those objections around oh, but why is this so expensive? So, and then, of course, social proof and story that's the other section you want to include is you know, testimonials, and you don't want to just bunch them up in one place, no-transcript, in a package. Talk about why it's needed and what it does for them. And then one of the sections that I think a lot of us service providers overlook is a hesitation handling and expectation setting section. So you want to think about what hesitation your audience has and then handle it accordingly. This could maybe be, you know, oh, let's do a comparative analysis of us versus, say, all of the photographers or all of the florists or all of the planners, or it could just be highlighting, you know, clarity on who you're for, who's your ideal client. You know you're the perfect. You're the perfect client for me, if and then lay out a list of that.

Speaker 2:

So you want to kind of have that handle those hesitations about whether or not you will be the best person for them. But then you also want to set expectations, and a great way to do that it would be having a frequently asked question section. So you're setting expectations. What happens next? Will you do this? Is travel included? Is you know? Are you going to be from you're from this time to this time? What's going to be extra? Have all of those in a nice neat little frequently asked question section at the bottom of your services sales page and you'll have way fewer people feeling like, oh, but I did not know about this, right, you would still have people who may not read all of that and you may still need to kind of reiterate it, but you'll at least have more informed prospects by the time they reach you for a call or for a discussion.

Speaker 1:

So I was waiting for the FAQ. Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 2:

I was like those are some of the sections you definitely want to include in your writing, your sales page. So yeah, yeah absolutely.

Speaker 1:

Definitely agree, the social, all of it. It's it's all, because what it does is it qualifies them before they say book or before they get on that discovery call with you. You know whatever that next step is and we just did in the member, in my membership, I do an accountability hour every month and our coworking session, whatever you want to call it, and the first 15 minutes we do a training, and so I did it on FAQ and.

Speaker 1:

I was likeworking session, whenever you want to call it, and the first 15 minutes we do a training. And so I did it on FAQ and I was like, okay, 45 minutes, let's create it. What's your FAQ? And so, yeah, yeah, and it's a great way to point people back, like if they have a question and they email you that, you can point them back to it or you can copy and paste that and it's don't have to like think up the answer again absolutely.

Speaker 2:

It's just one of those things that's such a strong sales system, um, and kind of really helps you to streamline your own processes but also make the whole process of working with you so much clearer and simpler. Yes, I agree. I agree.

Speaker 1:

Well, perna, I have a couple of bonus q a. If you're ready, all right. All right, let's do it. So can I ask you? This isn't on there, but you keep mentioning recipes and cookie cutters and all these things. Is there anything specific that you like to cook?

Speaker 2:

I love to bake. I'm a big baker. I in fact, just yesterday I baked a batch of banana bread, chocolate chip banana bread.

Speaker 1:

I'm going to do the same thing. I have rotten bananas that need to be cooked. Yes, I love banana bread.

Speaker 2:

Yes.

Speaker 1:

Wonderful, okay, but into the Q&A that I prepared you for, what is the last thing that you bought for your business?

Speaker 2:

Oh, that's pretty simple. I bought flight tickets to go to Chicago to speak at a conference, so that was business expense yeah, I was paid to speak it's called tastemaker. It's a conference for food bloggers. I was speaking on sales pages.

Speaker 1:

Yes, I love it. And do you have a word of the year or a favorite affirmation?

Speaker 2:

My word for the year is expansion. I always keep a word for the year, so this year it's expansion, expanding expansion in every form, both you know, physical health and business, and everything, and my I do have a favorite. I wouldn't call it an affirmation, it's more of a, a mantra or a model you may say it's like.

Speaker 2:

This too shall pass, because that used to be mine yeah, yeah, we started our business during a time of great you know, uh, it was a really hard time. It it was like my husband was on bedrest. He was, he had, you know, a lot of pain and but, yeah, just saying like this too shall pass, you know, keeps me grounded and helps me see that, yeah, both difficult times and even good times shall pass. So nothing is really permanent. So, yes, good times are great, enjoy them, but just don't get, you know, know that this too shall pass.

Speaker 1:

Right, there's light, it's coming, absolutely. I have a Bob Marley song. I don't know the title of it, but it's baby, don't worry bad thing. And so when, whenever I'm like stuck in something or it's been a bad day or whatever, it is like, that song pops in my head. So that's my current mantra, but it used to be. This too shall pass. Um, that's a, that's a great one. Um, okay, if we were sitting across from each other one year from today and we were popping a bottle in your honor, what are we celebrating?

Speaker 2:

Oh, I love that. Um, we are celebrating yet another best year ever, working with incredible clients and serving some great entrepreneurs inside, ready to Sell and intentionally profitable.

Speaker 1:

Yes, I love it. And where can our guests find you, prerna? And if there's anything else coming up you want to share, feel free.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I would love for everyone who's listening in to connect with us on Instagram. And if you'd like some really nice freebies for your business, go ahead and take our very fun food themed quiz at contentdistrocom backslash quiz.

Speaker 1:

I love it, thank you, thank you, thank you. This has been incredible.

Speaker 2:

Thank you so much again for inviting me. I had so much fun.

The Importance of Copywriting in Sales
Crafting Effective Sales Page Copywriting
Improving Sales Page Copywriting Strategies
Key Sections for Sales Page Success
Embracing Change and Celebrating Success